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Report recommends scrapping most NS school boards says system isnt working

first_imgHALIFAX – Nova Scotia’s school system is failing its students, according to a provincially ordered report that recommends all English-language boards be scrapped in favour of a single “aligned model.”Education consultant Avis Glaze released a report Tuesday that says the system is not working because of a “lack of clarity and coherence,” and as a result, students are in many cases performing below average compared to the rest of the country.Glaze says the administrative system should be realigned to reflect a unified and province-wide focus on students, with any savings directed back to classrooms.She said she heard a lot about mistrust within the province’s school system during the course of her consultations across the province.“They (people she consulted) said they had made recommendations in many cases and they have not been listened to. They have said that too many of our actions were political, and people mistrust when they think there is a political rationale rather than an educational rationale.”Glaze, who formerly served as Ontario’s education commissioner and as advisor to that province’s education minister, was hired by the province last October to look at all areas of administration and operations.Under one of her 22 recommendations, the seven regional school boards would retain their boundaries and names but operate as regional education offices.The province’s Acadian school board would retain its current structure while following provincial curriculum guidelines.Glaze said local voices would be maintained through the creation of school advisory councils with input from parents, students, principals and community members.Asked whether eliminating elected English-language boards could be seen as undemocratic, Glaze said that was for the government to decide.“People feel the status quo is not working,” Glaze said. “We have had an opportunity to improve the achievement of the children of this province and it is not happening. They felt that they need a new structure in order to make that happen.”But those involved with school boards said they were shocked by the recommendation.Hank Middleton, president of the Nova Scotia School Boards Association, said the boards “embrace” change and agree with many of Glaze’s recommendations, although they feel she is going too far in saying school boards should be eliminated.“Those school boards represent individuals in communities,” said Middleton. “I don’t think that somebody in an office in Halifax is going to have that understanding.”Gin Yee, chairman of the Halifax Regional School Board, also said he didn’t see the move coming, although he admitted the province would likely save money if it eliminates seven boards.“We provide an elected voice … we advocate on behalf of our constituents,” Yee said.Glaze’s report also recommends moving teaching support specialists such as literacy and math mentors from board offices into classrooms four days a week, with the fifth day dedicated to assessing student progress.She says assessment responsibility should be taken away from the Education Department and given to a new independent student assessment office.She also recommends the establishment of an education ombudsperson to investigate and resolve concerns or complaints in the education system.She would enhance the roles of the Council on Mi’kmaq Education and Council on African Canadian Education, giving them more leeway to directly advise the education minister.“This is a made-in-Nova Scotia model which I think should be looked at and further fine-tuned to make sure that it works,” Glaze said of her overall recommendations.Amy MacKinnon, a parent from Barrington, N.S., who sits as a member of a school advisory committee, said she particularly likes the idea that learning specialists be freed up to be in schools more often.“For a child that has a learning disability, to hear that specialists will potentially be coming into the school more often is a really positive step forward,” she said.Glaze also calls for a provincial college of educators to license, govern, discipline and regulate the teaching profession. She says the independent body would help improve public confidence in the education system.Another recommendation would see principals and vice-principals removed from the Nova Scotia Teachers Union and into a new professional association.The recommendations were quickly dismissed by the union, which called them a “recipe for chaos in our public education system.”“What this report lays out is essentially the same failed experiment the current government tried with health care,” union president Liette Doucet said in a news release.“This does nothing to help students or teachers, all it does is create a larger centralized bureaucracy while bringing division to our schools.”Doucet also said removing principals and vice principals from the union would not benefit students.“Our current collegial model places emphasis on conflict resolution and healthy staff relations, this creates a positive work environment that benefits teachers and their students,” she said.Education Minister Zach Churchill is to give the government’s response to Glaze’s recommendations during a news conference on Wednesday.“Our government is focused on building a stronger education system by putting more resources in classes. Student success is our singular focus,” he said in a statement Tuesday.last_img read more


WHY YOU SHOULD NOT DELETE IMAGES ON YOUR MEMORY CARD USING YOUR

first_imgMost people look at a memory card as a piece of plastic or metal, and they don’t think much about them. But inside those covers, there is a LOT of intelligence. There is flash memory, a controller and much more. The quality of that memory and controller often determines the speed and quality of your card.READ MORE As many of you know, I spent many years of my life as Director of Marketing at Lexar dealing with the ins and outs of the memory card business. And in all that time, I have never written a blog about the do’s and don’ts of memory cards. Now that I have left Lexar and not on that side of the business any more, I feel that I can write this objective piece for you without any conflict of interest.And if you are taking digital photos on a memory card (and you probably are), YOU WILL WANT TO READ THIS!First, let me explain the memory card in simple terms for you. Facebook Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitter Advertisementlast_img read more


Correction Media Ownership Rules story

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – In a story Oct. 25 about media-ownership rules, The Associated Press reported erroneously that Dennis Wharton was the head of the National Association of Broadcasters. He is executive vice-president of communications.A corrected version of the story is below:FCC plans vote over loosening limits on media ownershipThe Federal Communications Commission is planning to vote in November on proposals to roll back ownership rules that were meant to support diverse voices in local mediaThe Federal Communications Commission is planning to vote in November on proposals to roll back ownership rules that were meant to support diverse voices in local media.The newspaper and broadcasting industries have pushed for changes to the rules as they face growing online competition. Critics say dropping the rules will encourage media consolidation and hurt local voices and diversity.FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said Wednesday at a congressional hearing that he wants to eliminate rules that, among other things, bar a company from owning both newspapers and TV stations in one market. It’s been in place since 1975 but exceptions have been allowed.He also proposed scrapping limits on owning both local radio and TV stations, and would make it easier for one company to own two broadcast TV stations in one market.“The marketplace today is nothing like it was in 1975,” Pai said, adding that newspapers are shutting down and broadcast TV and radio stations are struggling, while competition from the internet, where Google and Facebook dominate in digital advertising, is rising.Republicans outnumber Democrats on the five-member the FCC, suggesting Pai has the support to change the rules. Democrats on the commission and in Congress have criticized efforts to undo or ease the rules.Dennis Wharton, executive vice-president of communications for the National Association of Broadcasters, said Wednesday that the limits have hurt TV broadcasters.He said the NAB supports Pai’s plan, and looks forward “to rational media ownership rules that foster a bright future for broadcasters.” It’s expected that rolling back the FCC limits will allow companies that own TV stations to get bigger.The FCC is currently reviewing a takeover deal between Sinclair and Tribune Media, two TV station owners. Pai has already allowed one rule change that eased the way for Sinclair by permitting it to reach more households than was otherwise allowed. It would reach more than 70 per cent of American households if the Tribune Media deal goes through.Companies like Sinclair own TV stations that run programming from the major networks, ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox, around the country.The head of Free Press, an advocacy group that fights against media consolidation, said that Pai’s plan will hurt independent news sources.“We need to strengthen local voices and increase viewpoint diversity, not surrender our airwaves to an ever-smaller group of giant conglomerates,” Craig Aaron said in a statement. He said Pai’s proposals will face opposition at the FCC and in the courts.last_img read more


Bill to prevent strike or lockout at OPG expected to pass today

first_imgTORONTO — The Ontario government is expected to pass legislation today that would prevent a strike or lockout at a utility that provides roughly half of the province’s power.The government called legislators back from the holiday break on Monday in an effort to end the dispute between the Power Workers’ Union and Ontario Power Generation, saying the move was necessary to stave off outages.The Progressive Conservatives say their bill, if passed, will send the matter to arbitration so it can be resolved without jeopardizing the province’s electricity supply.The Opposition has accused the Tories of fear-mongering and immediately turning to back-to-work legislation when there were less drastic options available.The union, meanwhile, has said it is disappointed with the government’s decision, which it says undermines bargaining efforts.The labour group, which represents about 6,000 OPG employees and another 10,000 energy sector staff, has been without a collective bargaining agreement since March 31.It said the utility’s final offer was rejected by a nearly 60 per cent vote of its membership, with the key sticking point deemed to be OPG’s refusal to grant over 300 “term” workers the same rights as full-time employees at the Darlington and Pickering Nuclear Plants.The union issued a strike notice last Friday, prompting the government to announce the emergency session, although government sources had already said that was a possibility.Workers would not walk off the job until three weeks after the notice was issued, however, due to rules surrounding the shutdown of nuclear equipment, the province has said.But it said outages could begin as early as this Friday as some equipment powers down.The Canadian Presslast_img read more


Bob Zimmer hosts Northern BC Caribou Closures Town Hall

first_imgZimmer applauds those that have written and called Federal and Provincial Ministers involved in the file. He shares, our region and residents have a right to be heard. The lack of transparency that continues to surround these Caribou Recovery Plans is deeply troubling. Pomeroy Hotel & Conference Centre Fort St. John FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – It has been two months since Bob Zimmer, local representatives and stakeholders began raising the alarm about plans for a potential Caribou Recovery Program in the Region.Zimmer will be hosting a Public Northern BC Caribou Closures Town Hall on February 2nd at the Pomeroy Hotel & Conference Centre in Fort St. John from 9:00 am to 11:30 am. This is an opportunity to bring the community together to discuss concerns and Zimmer hopes to get answers to questions.In Bob Zimmer’s January 21, 2019, Weekly Report, he shares that the promised public meetings with the Government have been cancelled, and future plans regarding the Caribou are still unknown. He goes on to say this could have an effect on our region, economically and recreationally.center_img 11308 Alaska RoadFort St. John, BC V1J5T5last_img read more


Move to increase women representation in parliament

“There are 15 items suggested in the 20th amendment to the constitution and the main item includes to increase the number of seats in parliament from 225 to 255. This was not proposed by any request from any political party but to accommodate more minority parties and the small parties in parliament,” he said. Further deliberations on the matter will be done at a meeting next week before it is presented to Parliament, Senaratne added. Senaratne further said that the government hopes to allow more women to be elected to parliament by increasing nominations. The latest set of election reforms also wants to encourage political parties to appoint women to bonus seats in parliament.The United National Party recently said that all major political parties in the island country have to commit that 50 percent of parliamentarians selected under the National List be women. (Colombo Gazette) The Government today said that it had proposed to increase the number of seats in parliament in order to have more minority and women representation.Cabinet Spokesperson Rajitha Senaratne said that the proposal had been put forward as part of the 20th amendment to the constitution by President Maithripala Sirisena in a weekly cabinet meeting. read more


PM discusses latest developments with Patricia and Feltman

Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe had talks with Commonwealth Secretary-General Patricia Scotland and UN Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs Jeffrey Feltman in New York and briefed them on the developments in Sri Lanka.During the meeting with Patricia Scotland the Prime Minister discussed strengthening ties with the Commonwealth. The Prime Minister also invited Patricia Scotland to visit Sri Lanka on an official visit.With Feltman, the Prime Minister discussed moves underway to draft a new Constitution for Sri Lanka. The Prime Minister’s office said that Feltman and Wickremesinghe also discussed the recent incidents of hate crimes in the country. (Colombo Gazette)


UAW workers vote to authorize strikes against Detroit 3

DETROIT — More than 96% of United Auto Workers union members have voted to authorize strikes against Detroit’s three automakers.The union said Monday the vote means leadership is authorized to call strikes against General Motors, Ford and Fiat Chrysler. But it doesn’t mean there will be a work stoppage.Contracts with the automakers expire at 11:59 p.m. Sept. 14.Later this week the union is expected to name a target company that will be the focus of bargaining. A deal with that company is likely to set the pattern for the others. If there is a strike, it would be against the target.Many observers expect a strike as the union seeks pay raises and the companies seek cost parity with foreign automakers that have plants in the U.S.The Associated Press


Environmental issues could worsen conflicts in southern Caucasus – UN report

The militarized situation in such places as Abkhazia, South Ossetia, Nagorno-Karabakh and adjacent regions of Azerbaijan also hampers waste management and disposal, and the maintenance and renovation of irrigation and hydroelectric dams, leading to stifled economic growth, according to the report, Environment and Security: Transforming Risks into Cooperation – The Case of the Southern Caucasus. Prepared by the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), the study examines both the negative affect of conflict in the region as well as the opportunities environmental issues present for cooperation and confidence building. Access to natural resources in conflict areas, management of cross-border environmental problems and the rapid development of the capital cities of Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia are some of the concerns highlighted in the new report, part of a wider effort called the Environment and Security Initiative, run jointly by OSCE, UNEP and UNDP. The report finds that the quality and mechanisms for sharing transboundary water resources – both surface and underground, and including the Caspian and Black Seas – are key concerns for all three countries, as is the disposal of abandoned Soviet weapons, chemicals and reclamation of contaminated lands. “The assessment demonstrated that in the worst case, environmental stress and change could undermine security in the three South Caucasian countries,” said Frits Schlingemann, Director of UNEP’s Regional Office for Europe. “However, sound environmental management and technical cooperation could also be a means for strengthening security while promoting sustainable development if the three Governments would decide to do so,” he added. read more


Onceinageneration opportunity will be squandered warns Guterres unless social economic environmental challenges

SDG9, Industry, innovation and infrastructure: The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) reported that youth represent almost one-fourth of all individuals using the Internet worldwide. SDG3, Good health and well-being: The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) noted that adolescent girls are disproportionately affected by HIV, accounting for nearly two thirds of all new HIV infections among adolescents. SDG5, Gender equality: ILO noted that young women earned around 22 per cent less than young men, largely because combined crowd work with childcare and other household responsibilities interfere with them taking on higher-paying tasks. SDG6, Clean water and sanitation: The World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF said that 12 per cent of schools had a limited sanitation service. Addressing the final plenary of the UN Youth Forum on Tuesday, he warned that “the once-in-a-generation opportunity we have to end poverty and bring lasting prosperity for all on a healthy planet, will have been squandered”.According to Mr. Guterres, each challenge has one common denominator: “the need for those in power to live up to their responsibilities; to do what is right for people and planet alike”.Lauding youth’s courage and persistence, he said that “more often than not, young people in our world today are a lightning rod for change”.Young people in our world today are a lightning rod for change — UN chief“Because it is your future, your livelihoods, your freedom, your security, your environment, you do not, and you must not, take no for an answer,” spelled out the Secretary-General, offering the partnership of the UN on “the journey towards a more peaceful, just and prosperous world”.He enumerated some of the challenges ahead, including curbing unemployment, poverty and illiteracy, along with various actions he and the UN is taking to meet them.“To make sure our work is relevant and effective, we need your ideas, your energy and your creativity”, said the UN chief, pointing to their work in inclusion, gender equality and human rights.He reminded the group that world leaders will meet in New York to catalyze “greater ambition, leadership and action” to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development saying that the key messages and outcomes of the Forum’s discussions would be shared with decision-makers and policy-makers in those meetings.“But that is not enough”, he underscored, “We need you to mobilize. We need you to activate your networks. “We need you to engage in the youth-focused events leading up to September, including Youth Day before my Climate Action Summit”.He urged everyone “above all”, to “be the change we need” and to “push world leaders” to step up their ambition and meet their responsibilities “to do what is right for people and planet alike”.He pledged the UN’s support as an organization “that truly works with you”.“Together we can ensure peace, prosperity, opportunity and dignity for all on a healthy planet”, he concluded.For her part, President of the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) Inga Rhonda King said that without youth, “we will not be able to move forward”.She called on countries to “engage young people in a meaningful way to make our world a better place” and encouraged them to be inclusive, involve youth in decision-making and to listen. SDG1, No poverty: The International Lavour Organization ( ILO) said that in 2017, an estimated 16.7 per cent of employed youth in emerging/developing countries earn less than $1.90 per day. SDG16, Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions: WHO says that globally, nearly one-in-three adolescent girls aged 15–19 years has been a victim of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence perpetrated by their husband or partner. SDG11, Sustainable cities and communities: UNDP said that by 2050, 66 per cent of the world will live in cities, making job creation critical for 73 million unemployed youth. SDG8, Decent work and economic growth: ILO revealed that globally there are 202 million unemployed people, 40 percent of whom are youth. Youth drive the Sustainable Development Goals SDG13, Climate action: The UN Development Programme (UNDP) noted that close to half a million youth globally have taken action on climate change. SDG10, Reduced inequalities: The UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) showed that the net income of combined social assistance and housing benefits is systematically lower for 20-year-olds than for the average recipient. SDG12, Responsible consumption and production: If current consumption/production patterns continue, by 2050, we would need the equivalent of almost three planets worth of resources to sustain our way of living.   SDG4, Quality education: The UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) said that 750 million adults – two-thirds of whom are women – remain illiterate. SDG2, Zero hunger:The World Food Programme (WFP) cited studies showing that every $1 invested in school meals programmes brings a $3-$10 economic return from improved health, education and productivity. read more


And The Heat Rolls On Dominate Celtics in Second

LeBron James and Co. ran over the Celtics.Since trailing the Indiana Pacers 2-1 in the Eastern Conference semifinals what seems like a few months ago now, the Miami Heat’s play has been, well, hot. Scorching hot. Unbeatable hot.That did not bode well for the Pacers the rest of that series and it did not bode well for the Boston Celtics Monday night in Game 1 of the conference finals in Miami. The results were similar to what Indiana experience: utter dominance led by the most dynamic tandem in the NBA, LeBron James and Dwyane Wade.Those two were again brilliant, and the Heat took a 1-0 series lead with a 93-79 Game 1 victory.James had 32 points 13 rebounds and Wade scored 22, 10 in the fourth quarter, when Miami sealed the game. That makes four dominating games by the Heat in general and Wade and James in particular since Indiana seemingly exposed weaknesses.“Let Wade and LeBron play in extreme comfort,” Boston coach Doc Rivers said. “And then the other players hurt us, too.”Those other players included Shane Battier, who had 10 points and 10 rebounds and was usually strong defensively. And in the first half, Mike Miller contributed eight key points.Still it was tied at 46-46 at halftime. But Boston, which was led by Kevin Garnett’s 23 points and 10 rebounds and 16 points by Rajon Rondo, just did not have the foot speed to effectively handle Miami on either end of the floor.“I never thought we got into our rhythm,” River said. “And they got way too many layups. There’s no way any team should get that many layups against our defense.”Game 2 is Wednesday again in Miami. Maybe by then Boston will have figured a way to cool off the Heat. read more


Dalgaranga gold project construction two months to first gold

first_imgGascoyne Resources provides an update on construction activities at its Dalgaranga gold project (DGP), which contains a Measured, Indicated and Inferred Resource of 31.1 Mt @ 1.3 g/t Au, which is inclusive of Proved and Probable Ore Reserves of 15.3 Mt @ 1.3 g/t.Process plant construction is +90% complete and on schedule for wet ore commissioning and first gold in May. Key activities include:SAG mill – installation well advancedCrusher – installation well advancedInstallation of mechanical equipment – well advancedElectrical installation – underwayWater Services – commissioned and handed over to the operations team.The airstrip has been completed and is fully operational. The power station and LNG storage facilities are on schedule for commissioning in mid-April.Mining has commenced with mining at Sly Fox, Gilbeys and Golden Wings underway. Ore mining at Sly Fox has commenced with the ROM stockpile being developed prior to commencement of processing in May. Drill and blast activities are underway at Golden Wings, with the first blast completed on March 16.All department heads have been employed and the majority of the operational team has commenced work.The DGP is located about 65 km by road northwest of Mt Magnet in the Murchison gold mining region of Western Australia and covers the majority of the Dalgaranga greenstone belt. After discovery in the early 1990s, the project was developed and from 1996 to 2000 produced 229,000 oz of gold with reported cash costs of less than $350/oz.The feasibility study that was completed on the DGP in November 2016 highlighted a robust development case. It investigated the development of two open pits feeding a 2.5 Mt/y processing facility resulting in production of around 100,000 oz/y for six years and concluded that the operation would be a low cost, high margin and long life operation with high operating margins.last_img read more


Homeowners are stepping up problem mortgage repayments but its not enough to

first_imgMORE IRISH HOME owners who have fallen into serious difficulty repaying mortgages are meeting restructured payment targets, research from the Central Bank has shown.The percentage of borrowers meeting targets handed down as part of a restructured mortgage arrangement has increased from 28% in the first quarter of 2011 to 55% at the end of last year.At the same time, the amount of problem mortgage holders who are making no repayment or limited repayments has also fallen.The percentage of borrowers making no payment after striking a deal with their lender came down from 29% to 13% over the three-year period.CautionDespite the marked improvement in repayments, the Central Bank cautioned that the mortgage arrears crisis is far from over, and warned that meeting repayment targets doesn’t guarantee that the loan will be repaid in full.“A full repayment does not necessarily imply a long-term sustainable solution, nor does it mean that the total outstanding balance will be repaid at term end.”The report also says that while “positive trends are welcomed…more work is needed to address the large number of loans still in default but which have not been modified”.The number of loans held by mainstream Irish banks which are in major repayment difficulty was around 28,585 at the end of last year.The report concludes by recommending that: More needs to be done before the arrears issue is resolvedThe report looks only at permanent dwellings, excluding the buy-to-let section of the mortgage market.ApprovalsElsewhere, new data from the Irish Banking Federation shows that the amount of mortgage approvals for the second quarter of the year hit a three-year high, with 2,268 loan applications given the green light.The new figures marks a 41.5% increase on approvals in the second quarter of last year. Source: Irish Banking FederationThe value of home lending exceeded €400 million for the first time since the series began, with €406 million approved during the second quarter of the year.The average value of an approved mortgage was €179,012, an increase of 5.5% when compared to last year.The IBF did not publish figures for how much was drawn down out of the approved loan total.Read: Warning over interest-only mortgage time bomb>Read: Long-term arrears would take 33 years to clear at current rate>last_img read more


Des couteaux sacrificiels préAztèques encore tachés de sang

first_imgDes couteaux sacrificiels pré-Aztèques encore tachés de sangPubliés mercredi 2 mai, les résultats de l’analyse, par des chercheurs mexicains, de couteaux de pierre vieux de 2.000 ans découverts au Mexique confirment l’utilisation de ceux-ci lors de sacrifices humains, bien avant le règne des Aztèques. Confiés il y a 2 ans à Luisa Mainou, de l’Institut national mexicain d’anthropologie et d’histoire, qui les a analysés au microscope à balayage électronique, ces 31 couteaux d’obsidienne vieux de 2.000 ans, issus d’une collection archéologique, ont révélé leur sinistre histoire. Portant non seulement des traces anciennes de peau et de cheveux, mais aussi de muscles et de tendons humains, ils ont clairement été utilisés pour des sacrifices rituels.À lire aussiMaladie de Charcot : symptômes, causes, traitement, où en est on ?Ils proviennent d’un site localisé dans l’état de Puebla (centre du Mexique) et appartiennent à la culture dite Cantona, peu connue, qui a précédé de plus de 1.000 ans celle des Aztèques. Divers autres indices suggéraient déjà ces pratiques : marques sur des ossements anciens, œuvres d’art précolombien et récits recueillis par les conquistadors, soupçonnés par ailleurs de diaboliser à l’excès les Indiens qu’ils envahissaient.”Il s’agit d’une démonstration convaincante que ces couteaux ont été utilisés pour couper la chair humaine. La confirmation archéologique de sacrifices humains est importante, tant pour soutenir que pour contester [donc pour jauger] les nombreux récits historiques post-conquête [européenne] et l’imagerie artistique d’avant la conquête, évoquant des sacrifices”, conclut Susan Gillespie, professeure agrégée d’anthropologie à l’Université de Floride citée par le Daily Mail.Le 6 mai 2012 à 11:47 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more


Opening day at the Del Mar racetrack

first_img KUSI Newsroom July 17, 2019 Updated: 6:53 PM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Today is opening day for the 80th season of racing at the Del Mar racetrack.KUSI Chief Photographer Mike Smith spent the day at the track. He shows us the fashions, food and of course, the horses at the opening day festivities. Posted: July 17, 2019center_img KUSI Newsroom, Opening day at the Del Mar racetrack Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more


Off Beat This battle wouldnt wait for him to put on rest

first_imgJohn Leach’s name was on a list of local Pearl Harbor survivors we ran on Dec. 7, when four veterans looked back on the attack some 73 years ago.That narrative didn’t include his story, but it’s a good one: Leach fought the battle in his underwear.Leach died Dec. 23, and his obituary noted that he was aboard the battleship USS California at Pearl Harbor.Leach expanded on that four years ago, in a Columbian story advancing the local Pearl Harbor observance on Dec. 7, 2010.“I was getting up, and the first torpedo knocked me on my butt,” he said.“I wasn’t dressed,” Leach said, and he rushed topside without stopping to grab the rest of his clothes. He saw the sky filled with planes with the rising sun symbol on their wings.“We could see that red circle. One (pilot) flew so low I could see him grinning at us.”Leach and another sailor took cover under the overhang of a gun turret.“A bomb exploded. I said, ‘Let’s get the hell out of here,’ and he was dead.”Leach’s shipmate was one of 2,400 American sailors, soldiers and Marines who were killed, including almost 100 officers and crewmen on the California.The ship had two Kingfisher patrol planes. Leach maintained one and also flew as a machine gunner and a radio operator.That plane gave Leach his first taste of naval firepower. It was mounted on a catapult, and launching it amounted to blowing it into the sky. Powder like that used to fire one of the ship’s guns provided the catapult’s thrust.“We went from zero to 60 (mph) in 60 feet,” Leach said. In his rear-facing back seat, Leach had to bend over and grab a hand hold or the force of the launch might damage his spine.It was good duty, he said, but Dec. 7 was his last day aboard the California. After the call to abandon ship, he swam to nearby Ford Island. He saw some planes and figured it was a good place for an aviation machinist’s mate. But that didn’t have anything to do with his first assignment.last_img read more


Man hospitalized after shooting outside NW MiamiDade home

first_imgBREAKING: Man shot 3 times outside of his NW Miami-Dade home this afternoon. Paramedics transported him to an area hospital. He is expected to be OK.The victim’s family and neighbors said they’re thankful the incident didn’t end in tragedy.“I started crying. I punched a wall,” said Angel. “I got really scared. I got mad.”The victim’s family said the bullets hit him in the back and side, but he is expected to recover. He underwent minor surgery and could be released from the hospital as early as late Sunday night.Meanwhile, police are searching for the men behind the shooting. They remain at large.If you have any information on this shooting, call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $1,000 reward.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. His family says he’s lucky to be alive. According to witnesses, he was working on his boat, when two men in ski masks rolled up on him and tried to steal his chain. @wsvn is on scene pic.twitter.com/rPGsi2uzss— Andrew Dymburt (@DymburtNews) October 14, 2018“I was inside the room, and then I hear my mom, everyone screaming, and then I come outside, and I see my uncle getting out of the boat with blood flooding like all over,” said Angel Mendez, the victim’s nephew, “and we immediately called the cops, and we took him there to the front of the house.”“Once I knew what was happening, I came right away,” said Louis, “and as soon as I got here, I saw all these cops, and I couldn’t believe it.”A photograph showed the victim on his feet outside of the home as he was treated by first responders. center_img MIAMI (WSVN) – Police are searching for the two men responsible for an attempted robbery outside of a home in Northwest Miami-Dade that ended in gunfire, sending one man to the hospital.According to Miami-Dade Police, the victim was shot in front of his residence near Northwest 49th Street and 31st Avenue, at around noon, Sunday.“This happened during daylight, bro. I can’t even believe it,” said Luis Mendez, the victim’s son.Witnesses said the victim was working on a boat while a friend was working on a car, both in the front yard, when the subjects, wearing ski masks, rolled up and demanded the chain one of the victims was wearing.“The guy actually pointed the gun at his head,” said Luis. “He could have been dead right now.”When the victim resisted the robbers, witnesses said, there was a struggle and shots were fired that struck the victim three times at point blank range. The subjects then ran off.last_img read more


BCCC Forms Taskforce to Examine Causes of Aprils Unrest

first_imgGordon F. May, BCCC president, said the college will get to the root cause of the events of April. (Courtesy Photo)Baltimore City Community College (BCCC) President Gordon  F. May, recently announced a city-wide task force to examine the root causes that led to the April 2015 unrest that resulted in the arrest of more than 250 people, reported physical damage to 350 structures and the looting of 27 drug stores across the city of Baltimore.The committee, chaired by Bryan Perry, General Counsel for BCCC, will host its kick-off event on the first week of December at the College.  The task force will work through next spring and focus on four issues:  limited access to education, poverty, lack of economic opportunities and the need for increased options for ex-offenders.“BCCC has been at the heart of this unrest and its aftermath”, said Perry in an interview with the AFRO.   Dr. May said that many BCCC students  “ hail from neighborhoods and communities most affected by the uprising. They are troubled by the nagging lack of opportunity available to many city residents,” May said.This is the latest task force to examine the events of April. On Nov. 16 The Police Executive Research Forum released a report “Lessons Learned from the 2015 Civil Unrest in Baltimore” that focused on the police’s response. Former Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts asked for the report before he was let go by Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake earlier this year. The report found that Baltimore police were underprepared and disorganized during the riots.BCCC’s task force will be composed 15-20 members, comprised of students, faculty, staff and community residents.  “Our students are from the surrounding community and our programs are for students and the community. We have received good feedback from the community and look forward to their thoughts and ideas” Perry said.The task force will issue recommendations to President May by May 2016. BCCC will also present its findings in a white paper that will be issued to local and state government officials, business concerns and the general community.BCCC is the only community college in the city of Baltimore and the only state-sponsored community college in Maryland. “BCCC serves as a critical gateway for many students from  Baltimore’s underserved communities “ said May.last_img read more


VIDEO How Physician Emigration Effects US Healthcare

first_img Recent Videos View all 606 items FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Molecular Imaging View all 22 items William Pinsky, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist and CEO of the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), and Mandeep Mehra, M.D., medical director of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) Heart and Vascular Center and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, explain the U.S. doctor shortage and how foreign doctors help fill the gap.According to 2017 data provided by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), 40 percent of interventional cardiologists, 30 percent of cardiovascular disease specialists, and 26 percent of pediatric cardiologists in the United States are international medical graduates (IMGs). However, as the physician shortage continues to impact primary care doctors, psychiatrists, OB/GYNs, among others, the U.S. also expects to see a shortage of cardiologists within the next 10 years, according to a spotlight cardiology study issued by the professional services firm PYA, which specialized in healthcare consulting.The interview was shot at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. William Pinsky and Mandeep Mehra explain how physician emigration effects U.S. HealthcareVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:32Loaded: 1.22%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:32 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Women’s Health View all 62 items Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophycenter_img Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Technology Reports View all 9 items Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Information Technology View all 220 items Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Videos | Radiology Business | March 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Physician Emigration Effects U.S. Healthcare Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Find more SCCT news and videos Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Sponsored Videos View all 142 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System.last_img read more


American Idol Lists Her Texas Estate for 1495M

first_imgAmerican Idol Lists Her Texas Estate for $1.495M July 19, 2012 401 Views Agents & Brokers Attorneys & Title Companies Celebrity Homes Investors Lenders & Servicers Processing Service Providers 2012-07-19 Abby Gregory in Data, Government, Origination, Secondary Market, Servicing, Technologycenter_img Share Another former reality star and current pop star is joining the real estate fray. Just days after _X_ _Factor_ champion Leona Lewis listed her home in Los Angeles, Kelly Clarkson, who won the U.S. version of the competition, _American Idol_, has put her ranch in Mansfield, Texas, on the market for $1.495 million. According to “”Zillow””:http://www.zillow.com/blog/2012-07-16/kelly-clarkson-lists-mansfield-ranch-for-sale/, Clarkson appears to be putting only a portion of her 50-acre property up for sale, as the listing encompasses only 14 acres. Clarkson customized the pretty estate, which was originally built in 1993, adding a man-made pond, lap and diving pools, a treehouse, and walking trails. The 6,880-square foot home includes two master suites, a home theater, and a gym. Zillow also noted that this isn’t the first property transaction for Clarkson, who also sold her Nashville estate in 2010.[COLUMN_BREAK][IMAGE]last_img read more